May Events

May 8th – Windrider Transit Open House 

1-2 pm City County Complex (414 East Callendar Street, Livingston)

Join the Windrider Transit Board for an open house! Food and beverages will be served and this informal board meeting will provide you a chance to hear a brief presentation about achievements of the Windrider Transit Program in its first 18 months, ask questions and meet the board members and some of our drivers!

Check out Windrider Transit Facebook page for more information on this free service and sustainable transport opportunity!

 

May 10th – Smith River Mine Comments Due

  • Public comments will be accepted until May 10, 2019.
  • A copy of the Draft EIS can be downloaded HERE.
  • If you would like to submit an email comment on the Draft EIS you can do so HERE.
  • Mail written comments to:

Craig Jones
Department of Environmental Quality
P.O. Box 200901
Helena, MT 59601

The proposed mine has serious potential to cause significant harm to the groundwater and surface waters of Sheep Creek, which flows through the project area and is an important tributary to the world renowned Smith River, one of the most scenic wild rivers in the state. Tintina is proposing to use an unproven, experimental mine waste and reclamation procedure that could leave Montana with a perpetual acid mine drainage issue needing perpetual water treatment long after the mine has played out.

Livingston is one of the two destinations (the other is Townsend) selected for the copper ore being transported from the mine to be transferred to shipment by rail to the west coast. Health and safety concerns arise around heavy truck traffic traveling down Highway 89, through the communities of Wilsall and Clyde Park, and the final destination at the rail yard in Livingston.

We encourage all to consider sending a comment letter to the DEQ.

 

May 13th – Active Transportation Coalition Monthly Meeting

6:15-7:15 pm @ Neptune’s Brewery (119 N L St, Livingston) 

Active Transportation Coalition mission is to promote active, safe and connected communities to all residents and guests through thoughtful design and consideration of all modes of transportation.

Meetings are held on the 2nd Monday monthly and the public is welcome and encouraged to attend.

 

May 18th – PCEC & Farm to School Park County Garden Work Day

9-12 pm Lincoln School Community Garden (215 East Lewis Street, Livingston)

PCEC is lending a hand in the Farm-2-School Park County Community Garden. Come get your hands dirty with us as we help prepare for spring planting! All are welcome and encouraged to come for all or part of the time.

 

May 19th – Clothing Swap N’ Brunch

10-12 pm, Lincoln School Auditorium (215 East Lewis Street, Livingston)

Did you know that American’s toss more than 25 billion pounds of clothing every years!? PCEC is teaming up with women in our community to host a clothing swap and brunch. It’s spring and we’re here to help you freshen up and build your zero-waste wardrobe. Open to everyone who wears and flaunts ladies’ fashion.

What to Bring: 5 – 15 ladies’ clothing items and a brunch item to share
What to Leave at Home: Underwear, socks, stained clothes

For more information, contact Kate French.

 

Looking Ahead! June 6th – CGNF Draft Revised Forest Plan Comments Due

Where and How to Comment

To submit a comment visit the Online Comment Portal

Mail In Comments
Forest Service
Attn:  Forest Plan Revision
Custer Gallatin National Forest, P.O. Box 130, Bozeman, MT 59771

Outside of Yellowstone National Park, wilderness is the greatest means of protecting the habitat and wildlands so crucial to preserving the uniqueness and diversity of wildlife in the Yellowstone region, as well as providing the necessary refuge we, and all species will need as the effects of climate change become more pronounced.

PCEC encourages support of Alternative D, which recommends a suitable percentage of forest as wilderness, not only in the Gallatin Range, but in other vital regions of the Custer Gallatin like the Crazy Mountains. If we want to ensure that the greater Yellowstone continue to maintain its vital importance for wildlife, intact habitat and ecological diversity for generations to come, as well as our reverence for wild places, we must encourage the Forest Service to enact a management plan that can provide for protections that will make that a reality.

For more information on the Draft Plan visit the CGNF Website 

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